Thursday, November 5, 2009

Question: I don't know if it's art...

Don't nobody not like paintings. The Mona Lisa? Everybody loves the Mona Lisa. Nighthawks? A personal fave. Botero? Chunky bourgeoisie-tastic! Dogs Playing Poker? A classic. What's your favorite painting? Yeah, you heard me. . . your favorite painting.

24 comments:

Tam said...

Anything by Van Gogh. Yep. His ENTIRE portfolio is my favorite.

AndrewPrice said...

Tam, Welcome. Good call on Van Gogh. Strange man, but an interesting painter!

JG said...

I have discovered Peter Max recently. He has some really good patriotic art. And I'm a huge fan of the baroque-era painters.

AndrewPrice said...

I don't know Peter Max, but I'll check him out. The baroque period is probably my favorite period for art, though my favorites are all over the place.

I do like Botero a lot (particularly his scultures) and, as noted, I really like Nighthawks.

Tennessee Jed said...

The Arnolfini Wedding by Jan Van Eyck. This oil portrait of the Arnofini's at their home in Bruges is an oil painting from the mid 1400's. It is one of the most complex paintings of all time. Check out the mirror reflection among so, so many other details.

Writer X said...

Andrew Wyeth. I've always loved his painting called "Christina's World." It hung in my dorm room in college. Still sort of haunts me to this day.

AndrewPrice said...

Jed, Fascinating picture. Reminds me of some of Vermeer's work.

AndrewPrice said...

Writer X, I don't really know Wyeth. Just checked him out. Interesting.

BevfromNYC said...

See you ask these questions that can't possibly be narrowed down to one. SO, once again I must break your silly rules and:

"Resurrection of the Christ","Raising of the Cross", "Descent from the Cross" and "The Ascension of the Virgin" by Peter Paul Rubens. These were the first paintings that I saw in a book and then recognized when I saw them by accident in place on the altars in Great Cathedral in Antwerp.

Tennessee Jed said...

Writer X - I am a great fan of Wyeth. Before retiring to Tennessee, I lived just a couple miles north of Chadd's Ford.

Bev - wow, those Rubens are really neat

Andrew - All the Flemish artists are amazing including Rembrandt.

Tam - I did get to see Van Gogh's works about ten or eleven years ago when they were on exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. It amazed me how much different and vibrant they look in person compared to reproduced as a plate in an art book.

Tennessee Jed said...

and since Bev brought it up, I'd be remiss to strictly play by the rules so I have to plug Peter Scalthorpe. His paintings of Chester County are fantastic. Over the fireplace in my living room is a water color of belted Galloways grazing on a winter night at a Pennsylvania field stone farmhouse.

The belted Galloway is my favorite cow, but I suppose that is for a different poll

Tam said...

Jed-It is quite a different experience to see famous paintings in life compared to in a book. It is also quite an experience, similar to Bev recognizing Rubens in Antwerp, to see the inspiration for an artist's work in life. I have a deeper appreciation for Monet after walking through his gardens in Giverny.

AndrewPrice said...

Jed and Bev, Don't worry about, I'm used to people breaking rules around here. ;-)

Jed, if I could paint, I would like to paint like Rembrandt. It's just such a vibrant style.

Another painting I really love is Castrovalva by Escher. I saw that one for the first time in DC and thought it was really stunning.

AndrewPrice said...

Tam & Jed, I agree. Art becomes much more interesting when you see it in person, rather than just reproduced in book. I'm glad that we live in a world where you can see some of these great works -- wouldn't have happened 200 years ago.


Bev, Those are great pieces.

AndrewPrice said...

Whoops... before anybody smacks me, it slipped my mind that Castrovalva is a lithograph.

Hence, I withdraw my statement and replace him with:

Giovanni Paolo Panini

"The View of Rome from Mt. Mario"

Sorry the link is commercial, but I can't find it anywhere else. I used to have a huge reproduction of this in my office and you could stare into it for hours it's that detailed.

(FYI, its normally brighter than the one at the link, but you take what you can get on the internet.)

Suzie1 said...

I'm in a Braque mood. This is a nice one.

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/braque/pedestal.jpg.html

StanH said...

Andrew it’s an original woodcut, inked and pulled by Escher though it’s a lithograph it’s original.

Rembrandt: “The Night Watch.” Red base buildup giving his painting a depth and warmth that of the Flemish painters I like best an incredible effort by any painter.

This was a tough one Andrew, and my post was getting to long, so I broke the Commentarama rules by following them.

Suzie1 said...

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/braque/pedestal.jpg.html

sorry

AndrewPrice said...

Suzie, Interesting choice. I like it.


Stan, I agree about the depth and warmth of the Flemish painters.

In an odd sort of way Stan, that logic makes you our biggest rule breaker. Bravo!

Di said...

Franz Marc, "The Large Blue Horses", or Pablo Picasso "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon".

AndrewPrice said...

Di, Welcome! I like that one -- The Large Blue Horses.

LawHawkSF said...

Andrew: I have a fondness for Dali. I particularly like his "Arrival in America of Christopher Columbus" but am awed by "The Crucifixion. (full title: 'Christ of St. John of the Cross')."

AndrewPrice said...

Lawhawk, I like Dali as well.

I'll tell you, I'm impressed with the selections people made. Very good choices, very diverse choices.

Jocelyn said...

My favorite is Jan Van Eyck. His paintings told stories. I can stare at them all day.

Post a Comment